Midwest Psychological Association

CREATING COMMUNITY DURING COVID-19

Midwestern Psychological Association Society For Community Research and Action Virtual Conference

June 5th 2020

8 AM to 7 PM CST

 

Time Session
8:00 AM

Welcome

8:30-9:20 AM

The Relationship Between Parents' Internalized Stigma and Child Treatment Outcomes (Roundtable)

9:30-10:30 AM

What Are Benefits of The Community Collaborating with Community Psychologists? (Roundtable)

10:30-11:20 AM

The Chicago Anti-Recidivism (CAR) Model - Collaborating for Social change (Roundtable)

11:30 AM -12:50 PM

Poster Session

1:00-1:50 PM

Bridging the Gap Between Classrooms and Community (Roundtable)

2:00-2:50 PM

MidwestECO 101: Planning and Practice in Student-Led Conferences (Roundtable)

3:00-3:50 PM

Putting Your Community Psychology Training to Use: Landing a Job and Doing he Work (Roundtable) 

4:00-4:50 PM

Race Matters: Even During COVID-19 - Panel Discussion

5:00-5:50 PM

Race Matters: Even During COVID-19 - Community Discussion

6:00-6:50 PM

Reception with Live Entertainment

Full Program

Session I

8:00 AM- 11:20 AM

8:00-8:30 AM                                                  WELCOME

 

8:30-9:20 AM

The Relationship Between Parents' Internalized Stigma and Child Treatment Outcomes

(ROUNDTABLE)

Samuel Yoo, DePaul University; Elzbieta Wiedbusch, DePaul University; Madeline Johnson, DePaul University; Krista Ekberg, DePaul University; Chelsea Torres, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University

Adolescents face unique barriers to mental health treatment services. Parents may inhibit services by refusing underreporting symptoms or outright denying services. The presenters will discuss contributing factors, like the stigma of mental illness as a product of failed parenting, cultural intersections of gender, race, and ethnicity, and more.

9:30- 10:20 AM

What Are Benefits Of The Community Collaborating With Community Psychologists?

(ROUNDTABLE)

LaShawn Littrice, National Louis University; Brad Olson, National Louis University; Judah J. Viola, National Louis University; Tiffeny Jimenez, National-Louis University; Ericka Mingo, National Louis University

This roundtable discussion will focus on the role of Community Psychologists in the community. There are important benefits of Community Psychology and the impact of community organizing, community advocacy, and community outreach. The systemic issues that affect the community should be at the core of our collaborative efforts.

10:30-11:20 AM

The Chicago Anti-Recidivism (CAR) Model: Collaborating for Social Change

(ROUNDTABLE)

Tonya Hall, Chicago State University; Martha Williams, Retired Chicago Public School Teacher; Christine Robinson, Lumina Foundation; August Hoffman, Metropolitan State University; Lindsey Wade, Howard Area Community Center

This roundtable will highlight the Chicago Anti-Recidivism (CAR) model, a community-based, participatory action research program designed to establish collaborations among key stakeholders to reduce recidivism rates of individuals returning to society (IRS) after incarceration. The purpose of the CAR program is to establish a theoretical model designed to empower individuals returning to society to be productive citizens contributing positively to their communities. Conference attendees are invited to join the roundtable discussion.

Session II 

POSTER SESSION 11:30 AM- 12:50 PM

1.     Hip-Hop H.E.A.L.S.: Talking the Talk to Walk the Walk

Jaleel K. Abdul-Adil, University of Illinois at Chicago; Roberto Lopez-Tamayo, University of Illinois at Chicago; Liza Suarez, University of Illinois at Chicago; Summer Akers, University of Illinois at Chicago; Jacqueline Moncivais, University of Illinois at Chicago; Taylor Roth, University of Illinois at Chicago & Samantha Brooks, University of Illinois at Chicago 

Hip-Hop H.E.A.L.S. uses strategically-selected Rap music and Hip-Hop culture to promote evidence-based practices for violence prevention and trauma-informed care in culturally- sensitive styles that target urban youth audiences. Preliminary mixed methods program evaluation of initial provider trainings suggests positive feedback that can inform dissemination and implementation efforts in urban communities.

2.     Barriers to Housing from the Perspectives of Individuals with Long-term Shelter Use Histories

Camilla Cummings, DePaul University; Molly Brown, DePaul University

There is limited research on barriers to housing among long-term homeless shelter stayers (LTSS). This qualitative study of 19 LTSS identified 12 themes describing barriers to housing across ecological levels. Findings have implications for programs to better serve this subset of the chronically homeless population.

3.     An Exploratory Analysis of Critical Motivation in Urban Mentoring Settings

Mary Takgbajouah, DePaul University; Catherine Pierre-Louis, DePaul University; Edith Chen, Northwestern University; David DuBois, University of Illinois at Chicago; Greg Miller, Northwestern University; Kathryn Grant, DePaul University

Critical Motivation (CM) measures perceptions of how able/committed one is to challenging inequalities/creating change. 100 students from DePaul University and Chicago Public School were administered a CM subscale. An ANOVA will determine variation in CM among different demographics/developmental stages to provide insight as how these different sub-populations experience CM.

4.     Student Experiences with the "Introduction to Community Psychology; Becoming an Agent of Change" Textbook

Ted Bobak, DePaul University; Olya Glantsman, DePaul University; Jack O'Brien, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University

The Introduction to Community Psychology; Becoming an Agent of Change textbook is tailored for undergraduates, but can be used by anyone who is interested in learning more about the field. Student satisfaction, readability, quality images, ancillary links, and pedagogical aids are the primary domains of this evaluation.

5.     Suicide among African American Children

Mia Kosmicki, DePaul University; Simone Parkas, Depaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University; LaVome Robinson, DePaul University

This poster explores the existing literature on suicidality among African American adolescents, especially those within the 5-12 age range, in order to identify common risk and protective factors specific to this population. Additionally, this poster offers suggestions for future research based on gaps in the literature.

6.     Círculo de Mamás: Moving from Community Assessment to Action

Lisa Edwards, Marquette University; Karina Loyo, Marquette University; Ashley Faytol, Marquette University; Mackenzie Goertz, Marquette University; Kat McConnell, Marquette University; Ian Turnbow, Marquette University

Círculo de Mamás provides an example of moving from community assessment to the development of an intervention to support perinatal Latinx mothers’ mental health. Early findings from this wellness support group suggest that mothers find it helpful and effective at decreasing loneliness and increasing a sense of support.

7.     Growth-focused activities in NMRs and academic outcomes among Latinx adolescents

Alexander O'Donnell, DePaul University; Bernadette Sanchez, DePaul University

Natural mentoring relationships are one space in which youth have opportunities to engage in activities longitudinally associated with intrinsic motivation, such as learning about subjects they are interested in. This relationship may moderated by the presence of school- related stressors. Follow-up linear regression analyses will be used to test these associations.

8.     Schools Use of Technology to Screen Youth At-Risk for Suicide

Chelsea Harris, DePaul University; Shaun Bhatia, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University; LaVome Robinson, DePaul University 

To help expand a school’s capacity to prevent suicides, a leading cause of death among adolescents, schools may consider the use of e-training tools and computer-assisted screeners. The likely benefits and potential concerns of using technology to aid schools in screening for youth at-risk for suicide will be explored. 

9.      Open Collaboration and Open Access: The Online Textbook Creation Process Jack O'Brien, DePaul University; Kaitlyn Ramian, DePaul University; Ted Bobak, DePaul University; Olya Glantsman, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University

The free, online textbook, “Introduction to Community Psychology: Becoming an Agent of Change” was published in 2019. There will be analysis and discussion of the creation process as a model for community psychologists to follow in making their own online resources.

10.  Gender Differences in Suicide for African American Adolescents

Melinda Troyka, DePaul University; Catharine Ryan, DePaul University; Chauncia VanLowe, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University; LaVome Robinson, DePaul University

Existing literature reveals noteworthy gender differences in both the rates and trajectory of suicidality for African American adolescents. This poster explores proposed theories for these differences, discusses the risk and protective factors in suicide for boys and girls, and provides implications for community-based interventions with African American adolescents.

11.  Estimating the Number of Recovery Residences in The United States

Elzbieta Wiedbusch, DePaul University; Ted Bobak, DePaul University; Leonard Jason, DePaul University

The study aims to gather an estimate of recovery residences. Findings reveal that there is no system records the number of recovery homes, no registration required for home owners, and no agency tracking the residences’ status. Future research should explore how affiliation affects outcomes of homes and its residents.

12.  When the Servant Serves the Community: Community Involvement and HEXACO-60

Ryan Claudio, DePaul University; Joseph R. Ferrari, DePaul University; Jakob Carballo, DePaul University; Rebecca McGarity-Palmer, DePaul University

Deacons are men of the Catholic Church who serve in both their communities and parishes. In this study Roman Catholic deacons (n = 1,349) completed an online survey. The community involvement of the participants was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA to see if it affected the participants’ HEXACO subscale scores.

13.  Interdisciplinary Community Coalitions: Examples from the Saving Lives, Inspiring Youth Cross-Age Peer Mentoring Program

Jamie Kessler, Loyola University Chicago; Ogechi Onyeka, Loyola University Chicago; Kevin Miller, Loyola University Chicago; Chana Matthews, Loyola University Chicago; Amzie Moore, Loyola University Chicago; Maryse Richards, Loyola University Chicago

Community-academic partnerships produce ecologically valid, community research, with community collaborators integral to understanding a community’s strengths and concerns. Tensions between research and practice may present challenges, particularly in marginalized communities. This poster explores community collaborations from Saving Lives, Inspiring Youth (SLIY), a community-based cross-age peer mentoring program in Chicago.

14.  Community-academic collaboration addresses cancer disparities in Chicago Latinx community 

Gina Curry, University of Chicago Cancer Center

Cancer in Chicago’s South Chicago community (#46) exceeds both local & national

rates. Despite a large percentage of the population identifying as Latinx that live, work, worship and play in the area, there are few community specific cancer resources for this

population. This poster will describe collaborative efforts to combat this disparity.

Session III

1:00 PM- 3:50 PM

1:00-1:50 PM

Bridging the Gap Between Classroom and Community

(ROUNDTABLE)

Catharine Ryan, DePaul University; Olya Glantsman, DePaul University; Sarah Pelletier, DePaul University; Jack O'Brien, DePaul University

DePaul University’s Community Psychology concentration requires undergraduate students to participate in a fieldwork internship at various locations including non-profits, research labs, counseling services, and more. This roundtable seeks to engage students, instructors, and audience members in a discussion about the importance of Community Psychology within the classroom and fieldwork.

2:00-2:50 PM

Midwest ECO 101: Planning and Practice in Student-Led Conferences

(ROUNDTABLE)

Vanessa Goodar, National-Louis University

Over 300 students, professionals and community members were in attendance at the 43rd Midwest ECO Conference. The conference focused on “Strengthening the Village: Global Implications of Social Solidarity”. In an attempt to be of assistance to the next generation of ECO organizers, we offer some points of consideration.

3:00-3:50 PM 

Putting your Community Psychology Training to Use: Landing a Job and Doing the Work

(ROUNDTABLE)

Judah J. Viola, National Louis University; Chanel Phillips, National Louis University; Tonya Roberson, DePaul University; Eileen Johnson, National Louis University; Jacqueline Samuel, National-Louis University

The presenters whose positions include hospital administrator, consultant, faculty member, non-profit manager, and government agency supervisor, will share lessons learned from their job search experiences and engage with audiences through dialogue for the purpose of disseminating knowledge of how to apply their training to their work settings.

Race Matters: Even During Covid-19 Panel Discussion

4:00-4:50 PM 

Race Matters: Even During Covid-19 Community Discussion

5:00- 5:50 PM

Reception with Live Entertainment

6:00- 6:50 PM


Conference Planning Committee

Amber Kelly, Community Engagement Collective

Tonya Hall, Chicago State University

Chris Smith, Society for Community Research and Action

ADD Moshood Olanrewaju, National Louis University

Jean Hill, Society for Community Research and Action

Susan Torres-Harding, Society for Community Research and Action