The Community Psychologist

A Publication of the Society for Community Research and Action
Division 27 of the American Psychological Association

Volume 51 Number 4 
Fall 2018

From the PresidentBrad_Olsen.jpg

Bradley Olsen 
bradley.olson@nl.edu
National Louis University Chicago

Dear SCRA Members,

Returning to the Executive Committee over a year ago, after such a long absence, I have been able to see up close the many activities driven by SCRA members, who also feel like friends and family. And, of course there are new members adding to the collective tasks and activities, and all of it is, it feels, like a unique, vibrancy of SCRA.

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From the Editors  

Dominique_Thomas.jpgSusan_Wolfe.jpg

Susan M. Wolfe, Susan Wolfe and Associates, susan@susanwolfeandassociates.com and Dominique Thomas, University of Michigan, tdominiq@umich.edu

We think the biggest news for this issue is the new delivery format and the look of the new TCP. We hope you like it. For those of you who will miss the paper copy arriving in the mail, we hear your pain. Susan loves thumbing through a physical copy and will also miss it. However, we are excited about the possibilities this new format will provide. First, we won’t have the space limitations and will be able to share more pictures and content without having to shrink the font size so small that we need to use a magnifying glass to read it or be forced to hold back articles until future issues. Second, it allows us more freedom and flexibility for layout and design. And third, we will be saving the lives of countless trees as we move forward with the pdf format. We hope that the wonderful content we have received from SCRA members will compensate and we invite you to print and share it.

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Special Feature

In 2015, the Executive Committee of SCRA created a Leadership Development Fellowship Program based upon a proposal created by Nellie Tran, Tiffeny Jimenez, John Moritsugu and Bret Kloos. The proposal was created in response to discussions among SCRA leadership recognizing that individuals from underrepresented groups had fewer opportunities to participate at the leadership level throughout the organization and that the mission and vitality of SCRA could be strengthened by expanding efforts to be more inclusive. Much of the initial framework was modeled on a similar program from the Asian American Psychological Association’s leadership program. We very much appreciate that The Community Psychologist has created a special section to highlight the work of the first cohort of Leadership Development Fellows and to introduce the second cohort of fellows. In the Spring of 2019, we expect that SCRA will recruit a third cohort of Fellows. 

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The Community Practitioner

Edited by Olya Glantsman, DePaul University

By Olya Glantsman, Jack O’Brien, and Katie Ramian with Carlos Luis

Carlos’s disclaimer: I apologize if bringing religion and spirituality seems inadequate, however, I cannot deny that my journey to and within Community Psychology has been guided by God, and my experiences with faith communities. For me not to mention this, would be to deny my Faith and core beliefs. I hope the reader excuses the language, should it be deemed inadequate. I can assure you, it is not a proselytism attempt.

Criminal Justice Interest Group 

Edited by Jessica Shaw, Boston College of Social Work

The Criminal Justice Interest Group Column features recent and ongoing work of our members. We encourage readers to reach out to the authors if they are interested in learning more or exploring potential opportunities for collaboration. We also invite readers to join one of our upcoming Learning Community Series presentations in which Criminal Justice Interest Group members share their work virtually to foster a learning community. More information, and recording of prior presentations, can be viewed at http://www.scra27.org/who-we-are/interest-groups/criminal-justice-interest-group/.

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Cultural and Racial Affairs

Edited by Jesica Siham Fernandez, Santa Clara University and Dominique Thomas, University of Michigan

BRIDGING ACADEMIA AND PRACTICE: DECOLONIZING COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 

Written by Geraldine Palmer, PhD., Past-Chair, CERA

An expressed commitment of community psychology is to intentionally engage race, culture and ethnicity as key factors in community research and action (Cruz & Sonn, 2011). As a Council of the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), CERA (Culture, Ethnic and Racial Affairs) recognizes that to deepen emancipatory practices in community psychology (p. 203), and psychological science in general, it is important and crucial to include decolonizing efforts. These efforts must also be centered and the focus also on community psychology textbooks. CERA’s mission and goals include representing issues of cultural diversity and promoting the concerns of people of color as a focus of community research and intervention. To this end, a number of CERA members are authoring a chapter on Oppression and Power in an upcoming open-access, undergraduate textbook edited by Olya Glantsman and Lenny Jason. Chapter authors include Geri Palmer, Past-Chair, Jesica Siham Ferńandez, Chair, Dominique Thomas, Chair-Elect, along with members: Gordon Lee, Latriece Clark, Bianca Guzman, Ireri Bernal, and allies, Hana Masud, Catalina Tang and Sonja Hilson.


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The Education Connection

Edited by Simón Coulombe, Wilfrid Laurier University 

COLLABORATING TO CREATE CHANGE

A GRADUATE STUDY'S EXPLORATION INTO THE NEEDS OF AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAMMING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH

Written by Karinna Nazario, Taylor Strange, Alicia Beadle, Lisa Kawecki, and Nghi D. Thai

Student engagement and high impact practices such as participatory research are essential for both undergraduate and graduate students in the field of community psychology (Main et al., 2016; Thai, Helm, & Leavy, 2016). These real-world connections and the application of community psychology principles are beneficial for students at different levels and with varying interest in community psychology. The project shared here from the perspectives of three students and one community partner highlights the value of collaborative and participatory projects and demonstrates how action research aimed to create direct change can have positive impacts for the community.

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Immigrant Justice Interest Group

Edited by Fabricio Balcazar, University of Illinois at ChicagoFabricio.jpg

During the APA conference in San Francisco, I was invited to represent our interest group at a symposium entitled “Exploring the psychological and social harm to immigrant youth and families in detention facilities.” The symposium was very well received as it brought diverse expertise into the discussion of the adverse impact of immigration policies. I want to share a brief summary of the presentations and present some actions psychological organizations are taking and subsequent policy recommendations. 
Read more at http://www.scra27.org/publications/tcp/immigrant-justice-interest-group/#M75g2BlcJDOeOSq6.99

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Living Community Psychology

Written by Gloria Levin

“Living Community Psychology” highlights a community psychologist through an in-depth interview that is intended to depict both personal and professional aspects of the featured individual. The intent is to personalize Community Psychology as it is lived by its diverse practitioners. Prior columns are available online at http://www.scra27.org/publications/tcp/tcp-past-issues These past columns contain a wealth of life advice gleaned from over 60 profiled community psychologists, from graduate students to retirees, representing an invaluable resource for community psychologists.


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Public Policy

Edited by Taylor Scott, Penn State University

STUDENT VOICE PROJECT

POLICY-INFORMED RESEARCH ON YOUTH PERCEPTIONS OF THE BALTIMORE CITY SCHOOL POLICE FORCE

Written by Lindsay Emery, Patricia Ferguson, Natasha Link, Taylor Darden and Loren Henderson

In response to increases in juvenile violence and high-profile school shootings during the 1990s, the United States has seen increased implementation of policies and practices intended to improve the safety and well-being of students (Fader, Lockwood, Schall & Stokes, 2015). However, some argue that these policies perpetuate the school-to-prison pipeline and the criminalization of youth behavior, particularly among youth of color (Harvard Law Review, 2015). One of the popular interventions that came about in response to these events was the creation of school resource officers (SROs), programs that assign uniformed police officers to public schools (Bracey, 2010). In Maryland, a statute specifically provides a “Baltimore City School Police Force,” which is comprised of police officers trained through the Maryland Police Training Commission and the Civil Service Commission of Baltimore City (Council of State Governments Justice Center, 2014). On March 31, 2015, Baltimore City school officials outlined sweeping changes to how Baltimore’s School Police Force operates. Also, at this time, the death of Freddie Gray in April 2015 while in police custody sparked local and national outrage, highlighting once again issues of police brutality against communities of color. While many perspectives were shared in the current public debate in Baltimore City, including those of parents, teachers, advocates, and police officials and leaders, the voice of youth went unsolicited by relevant stakeholders. In light of this debate and the highly publicized unrest involving youth in Baltimore City following the death of Freddie Gray, the question of the state of police-student relationships was and remains particularly salient.

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Regional Network News

Edited by Scot Evans – Regional Network Coordinator

“And all at once, summer collapsed into fall” - Oscar Wilde.  The fall season is a great time to check out your SCRA region information on the website and contact the coordinators to see what is going on in your neck of the autumn woods (http://www.scra27.org/who-we-are/regional-activities/). There are a lot of great things happening in our SCRA regions across the globe – check out the news from the Midwest and Southeast regions of the U.S. and info on the Community Psychology Conference in Slovakia.

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Research Council

Written by Chris Keys, DePaul University

BUILDING A STRUCTURE FOR RESEARCH IN SCRA: LAUNCHING THE SCRA RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM

As SCRA became involved with strategic planning following the 2015 Biennial hosted by the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the SCRA Executive Committee realized that research was not a central part of the plan. Yet research is part of the air we breathe in SCRA. One of our central principles is scientific grounding for our work. Among other things, we create knowledge. Knowledge and understanding are fundamental to what we do and how we make progress as a field. Further, for our field to be sustainable, we must have active researchers in academic positions who can educate and mentor future generations of community psychologists. AJCPTCP, Biennial, mini-grants, awards and other SCRA activities are devoted to and/or include specific forms of research in one way or other as an important part of their focus. Yet somewhat surprisingly, we have no complementary structure within SCRA that is broadly committed to research in its many manifestations and researchers in their various activities and career stages. Sustaining and enhancing our knowledge base is central to the mission of SCRA. With these thoughts in mind, in 2016 led by Jack Tebes and Dina Birman, the Executive Committee asked that science be added to the strategy for the Society’s future growth. Jack Tebes, Dina Birman and Chris Keys agreed to develop plans for structuring research more explicitly into SCRA as an organization and came up with the idea of a SCRA Research Council as the vehicle for doing so.

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Self-Help Interest Group

Edited by Tehseen Noorani, University of East London

COLUMN EDITOR’S NOTE: In this interview, Kevin Franciotti introduces Psychedelics in Recovery (PIR), an addiction recovery mutual aid group where members use psychedelic substances as part of their recovery journeys. Often translated as ‘mind-manifesting’, the careful use of psychedelics can produce remarkably lucid experiences, offering insights ranging from the sensory-perceptual and the biographical to the spiritual and the mystical. As is often the case with the formation of new mutual aid groups, PIR challenges many assumptions, in this case about psychedelic drugs, about addiction and about recovery. Franciotti can be reached through www.kevin.franciotti.net.
Read more at http://www.scra27.org/publications/tcp/self-help-interest-group/#6pvbvDYM7aGTWFfd.99

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Student Issues

Edited by Jaimelee Behrendt-Mihalski & Erin Godly-Reynolds, University of North Carolina Charlotte

GRADUATE STUDENT INSTRUCTORS IN THE COLLEGE CLASSROOM

USING DISCLOSURE WHEN TEACHING ABOUT DIVERSITY

Written by Christina J. Thai, Seini O’Connor, Lydia HaRim Ahn, and Katherine Morales, University of Maryland, College Park

Many graduate students in psychology have opportunities to work as instructors or teaching assistants for undergraduate classes. Whether or not these classes focus exclusively on multicultural psychology, they may provide an opportunity to engage in important conversations regarding diversity. Weaving a rich understanding of diversity into instruction is critical for helping undergraduates develop as more aware members of the community. It is also helpful for graduate students who want to develop further as multiculturally-competent psychologists, in line with the APA’s recently revised Multicultural Guidelines (2017).

SCRA Member Spotlight

Edited by Dominique Thomas, University of Michigan

The SCRA Member Spotlight is a new way for us to engage our members and highlight great works! Each issue will we solicit submissions of accomplishments. We especially would like students, early career scholars, and practitioners to submit their accomplishments and work. Submission can include but are certainly not limited to:

  • New jobs
  • Post-docs
  • Promotions
  • Thesis/Dissertation Defenses
  • Newly published journal articles, books, chapters
  • Podcasts, blogs, news items that are by or about you
  • Certifications or other credentials
  • Retirement
  • Grants
  • Awards
  • Successful/ongoing projects
  • New projects of community initiatives

If you are interested in submitting for the next issue, please click this link and fill out the form. We hope to hear from you!


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Book Review

Written by Ann Webb Price, Community Evaluation Solutions

BROWN, M. B. (2018). CREATING RESTORATIVE SCHOOLS. LIVING JUSTICE PRESS.

In 2018, there were 23 school shootings that took place in high school or college settings resulting in injury or death (Source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html). When looking more specifically at gun violence that takes place at an elementary, middle, or high school, there were 11 cases of school gun violence, making 2018 one of the most violent years to date. The Washington Post study found that approximately 130 students, educators, staff and family members have been killed in assaults during school hours, and another 254 have been injured. Their analysis found that 62.6% of students exposed to gun violence at school since 1999 were children of color, and almost all those shootings were targeted or accidental, rather than random acts of violence. Many people who commit these acts do so with a gun they obtained from their own home or from friends’ or relatives’ homes. Although we might like to believe there is a certain “type” of person who carries out extreme acts of violence in schools, there is no typical shooter and most do not have a mental illness.


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From our Members

Edited by Susan M. Wolfe, Susan Wolfe and Associates

USING FICTION IN THE UNDERGRADUATE COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY COURSE

Written by David S. Glenwick, Fordham University, John N. Moritsugu, Pacific Lutheran University, Andrew E. Rasmussen, Fordham University, and Philip T. Sicker, Fordham University

EDITORS’ NOTE: This article originally appeared in the Winter 2017 TCP issue. The print version omitted a segment of the article. We are including the article in its entirety in this issue of TCP. The online version of the article is Winter 2017, Volume 50, Number 1 in the Education Connection column.

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SCRA Announcements

Edited by Susan M. Wolfe       

Distinguished Contributions to Practice in Community Psychology

SCRA AWARDS CALL 2018-2019 

THE DEADLINE FOR ALL AWARD NOMINATIONS IS DECEMBER 1, 2018. ALL NOMINATIONS SHOULD BE SENT ELECTRONICALLY TO: awards@scra27.org.

SCRA encourages nominations that represent our diversity as a community psychology principle and value and that implement diversity in practice. We are especially looking to include the perspectives and backgrounds of people, groups, and organizations from traditionally underrepresented groups based on ethnicity/race, immigrant/refugee status, cultural minority, sexual orientation, disability, or socio-economic status. For more information on SCRA's diversity statement, see http://www.scra27.org/who-we-are/

Please Note: All nominees must be current member of SCRA and have been a member for the past one (1) membership renewal year unless otherwise stated in the call. 

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