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The
Community
Psychologist

Volume 53   Number 1 Winter 2020

From the Editors  Dominique_Thomas.jpgSusan_Wolfe.jpg

Dominique Thomas, University of Michigan, tdominiq@umich.edu and Susan M. Wolfe, Susan Wolfe and Associates, susan@susanwolfeandassociates.com 

Happy New Year! We hope that everyone had a relaxing and refreshing holiday break! To start off the New Year, we’re bringing you a Winter issue full of great community psychology work being undertaken by many of our members. We thank everyone who submitted their work!

President Susan Torres-Harding discusses in her column the renewed focus on work addressing the systems of oppression and increased hate crimes affecting many marginalized communities. The Council on Education and the Public Policy Committee also attended to issues of racial justice in their columns. We reiterate the needs to attend to how community psychology can be a force for positive social change and how some of these harmful ideologies may be reproduced within the field. These interconnected issues are reaching breaking points in which the ramifications will be felt most by those most marginalized. With this in mind, we organized two special features on racial justice and community collaborations respectively. Each of the special features takes special attention to promoting equitable and just community-based research. Common across both special features are considerations of power, whether it is helping communities build their own power or addressing unjust power dynamics.

The combined work of councils, committees, individual community psychologists, and communities is needed to promote social justice and liberation for the many communities who are feeling threatened, unsafe, and targeted. Community psychology must truly embrace the idea of community and cooperation to be the agent of social change we want it to be.

Susan and Dominique